David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

 

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Dr. Dame Daphne Sheldrick passed away in 2018 at the age of 83, but her legacy continues with her daughter, Angela Sheldrick as CEO.



David Sheldrick was the founding warden of Kenya's largest national park, Tsavo East National Park. They both worked hard to save wildlife. Dame Daphne focused on baby orphaned elephants that lost their mother due to poaching. The issue to their survival was having "mother's milk". Dame Daphne spent almost three decades trying to develop a formula that simulated a mother elephant's milk and nutrition required for an orphaned elephant to survive. She succeeded, and was the first person in the world to raise elephant orphans and rhinos.

After David Sheldrick's death, Dame Daphne and her family, started the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and Orphans' Project in Naroibi National Park. 

Fast Fact: For the first two years of life, a baby elephant needs about forty-two gallons of its mother’s milk each week (each elephant rescued gets five pints of milk every three hours, day and night). 

Besides David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust (DSWT) raising orphaned infant elephants, they also fund and operate full time anti-poaching mobile units in Tsavo National Parks in Kenya, Africa. "Working closely with Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) they locate and treat elephants and wildlife injured from poaching activities". Many poachers are caught and arrested thanks to DTWS and KWS dedication to elephant and wildlife conservation.

Sheldrick Wildlife Trust also has six mobile veterinary units and a sky vet that is run by Kenya Wildlife Service. To learn more, click the link.

DSWT also provides water for wildlife, habitat preservation, canine unit for helping to track poachers, area surveillance, and lodges to stay if you want to visit and spend time at their orphanage.

To learn more about David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and their organization, mission, projects, and conservation of wildlife:  David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust


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